Cinema releases: “The Beast”, “Daaaaaalí!” », “Green Border”, “The Kingdom of Kensuké”…

Cinema releases: “The Beast”, “Daaaaaalí!” », “Green Border”, “The Kingdom of Kensuké”…

Movies

THE MORNING LIST

This week, two French filmmakers in great form: Bertrand Bonello with La Bête , Quentin Dupieux with Daaaaaalí!. Let’s add a shocking fiction about migrants, Green Border , by Agnieszka Holland, and a poetic animated film, The Kingdom of Kensuké , by Neil Boyle and Kirk Hendry.

Do not miss

“The Beast”: in the jungle of romantic impasse

The Beast marks a return to the “grand form” for the heterogeneous work of Bertrand Bonello, formalist goldsmith of French cinema. Second French adaptation in a short time, after The Beast in the Jungle, by Patric Chiha (2023), of the eponymous short story by Henry James (1903), the film is divided into three eras, between which the same character circulates, Gabrielle, played by Léa Seydoux. In 2044, in a near future entirely taken over by artificial intelligence, the young Parisian, who is struggling to find a job, must submit to a program aimed at “cleansing” the traumas of her previous lives. On the operating table, she is plunged back into 1910, into the salons of the Belle Epoque.

During a party, Gabrielle meets Louis (George MacKay), a dreamy young man to whom she expresses a persistent anxiety: her presentiment of an imminent catastrophe. The meeting will happen three times: in the past, in the future and halfway, in 2014, where we find Gabrielle in Hollywood as an aspiring actress and going to castings.

It’s really about telling the same romantic impasse three times, in as many different genres and colors. But love doesn’t just repeat itself. He searches through the ages for an opportunity to realize himself, to happen, as much as “the beast” who haunts Gabrielle. The film thus finds its continuity in its broken lines, like certain North American free electrons like David Lynch ( Lost Highway, Mulholland Drive ) or David Cronenberg ( Crash, Le Festin nu ), perhaps even also the Je I love you, I love you (1968) by Alain Resnais. Ma. Mt.

“Daaaaaalí!” »: pop-up on the Catalan artist

Quentin Dupieux plays a trick on us with this new feature film, through scenes that fit into each other like a succession of dreams. We board a roller coaster, which takes us from a hotel suite, in which a young journalist, Judith (Anaïs Demoustier), is feverishly waiting to interview Salvador Dali (1904-1989), to others incredible meeting with the Catalan artist, who will never stop showing off.

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